1960s to Modern Era in America

The 1960s was a period in American history that was marked with conflict and social revolution. Here you can find information about major events that took place in the 1960s and events in the modern era.


Has a nuclear bomb ever been dropped on the United States? Well, it happened back in the 1950s. But... it was an accident.

The tension between the U.S. and USSR was palpable — and nearly devastating, thanks to some nuclear-tipped torpedoes and itchy trigger fingers.

Treasure hunter Tommy Thompson claims he can't remember where he put 3 tons of gold from the shipwreck of the S.S. Central America. The courts don't believe him.

Ethnic brand identities and mascots affect people with different political leanings in surprising ways, at times increasing associations with Native American stereotypes.

In 1985, the Hanshin Tigers won the Japanese World Series. In the ensuing celebration, though, a statue of Colonel Sanders was drowned, and the team hasn't won since.

By the 1960s the lonesome whistle of the steam railroads was a thing of the past. The decline of railroads came about during the 1960s and 1970s as the automobile dominated transportation.

Railroads of the 1990s explains the history of American railroads through the 1990s. Technological advancements have shaped the railroads of this decade. Learn about the history of railroads of the 1990s.

Famous locomotives, such as the John Bull locomotive, have helped shape the history of American railroads. These trains are well-known to many railroad historians. Learn more about some famous locomotives.

Shortline railroads were slowly abandoned as truck shipping became more accepted. Fortunately, smaller railroads are causing shortlines to become popular once again. Learn more about the history of shortline railroads.

Railroad super-engines were produced in the mid-1990s with the same size but more power than standard locomotives. They were produced by General Motors and General Electric, the two largest engine manufacturers. Learn about railroad super-engines.

Railroad technology has greatly changed the way in which railroads conduct business. Computers have automated much of what used to be done by the work of several people. Learn about some of the developments in railroad technology.

When you hop on a train, you assume that the wrecks and accidents of the old railroads are a thing of the past. How do engineers determine if a railroad is safe?

The Union Pacific railroad almost joined with the Southern Pacific lines in 1909. Unfortunately, the man behind this deal never saw his dream realized. Learn about the Union Pacific railroad in this section.

On the day Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as President, January 20, 1981. the Iranian government released the American hostages, the culmination of months of negotiations.

Black Power Movement, in United States history, an effort among black Americans to gain control of the institutions that affect their daily lives by acquiring independent economic, social, and political power.

Counterculture , a set of behaviors and beliefs that are radically different from those of mainstream society.

Cuban Missile Crisis , a confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union, October 22 - 28, 1962, that threatened to precipitate nuclear war.

Iranian Hostage Crisis, a diplomatic conflict caused by the holding in captivity of United States embassy personnel by Iranian militants from November 4, 1979, to January 20, 1981.

SALT, in international diplomacy, the common name for negotiations and treaties between the United States and the Soviet Union intended to limit strategic nuclear weapon strength of each nation.

War Powers Act, the common name for the War Powers Resolution, which was passed by Congress in 1973 as a check on the President's war powers.

The Presidential election of 1960 was held in an atmosphere of strained international relations and increasing racial tension in the United States.

President Nixon began his term of office in 1969 with a pledge to seek peace abroad and tranquility at home.

The nation's economy continued to grow in 1989, although at a slightly slower rate than in the preceding five years.

With the end of the Cold War, the United States concentrated its attention on the economy.

On September 11, 2001, members of an Islamic terrorist network called A1 Qaeda hijacked four commercial airliners.