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How Prohibition Worked

After Prohibition

After Prohibition was repealed, it was left up to the states to decide how to govern alcohol consumption. Most states made 21 the legal drinking age, although a handful required drinkers to be only 18. No national drinking age existed until 1984, when the National Minimum Drinking Age Act was passed. One major catalyst behind the creation of this law was the increase in deaths related to drunk driving.

The 1980s and '90s saw a major movement to decrease drunk driving — Candy Lightner founded Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) after a drunk driver fatally hit her daughter in 1980. Since then, alcohol-related driving fatalities have decreased substantially. In 1982, 60 percent of automobile-related fatalities involved alcohol. By 2017, that number had dropped to 29 percent.

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Despite the national repeal on Prohibition, hundreds of counties in the United States enforce "dry" laws. These laws typically ban the manufacture and sale but not consumption.

  • Six of Mississippi's counties are dry.
  • Kentucky isn't much better for alcohol lovers. Of the 120 counties in Kentucky, 15 counties are dry, including
  • Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, Kansas and Virginia also have a large proportion of dry counties.
  • Hundreds of dry towns (within wet counties) also exist across the country.

Many, many other rules exist regulating the sale and consumption of alcohol on a local level. They often seem confusing and contradictory. One other once-common rule restricts the sale of alcohol on Sundays. This law was developed in Colonial times to honor the Christian Sabbath day in Colonial times.

Last editorial update on Jan 17, 2020 01:50:02 pm.

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