1960s to Modern Era in America

The 1960s was a period in American history that was marked with conflict and social revolution. Here you can find information about major events that took place in the 1960s and events in the modern era.

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The 2004 incident in Granby, Colorado, left half the town destroyed. Now 17 years later, Marvin Heemeyer, the man who piloted the tank that crushed the library and town hall, has become a hero to antigovernment extremists.

By John Donovan

Secretary of State Colin Powell came up with a framework of eight questions that the U.S. should say "yes" to before going to war. What were they, and are they still relevant?

By Kathryn Whitbourne

The phrase "systemic racism" has become very widespread in the U.S. in the past year or so, but what does it really mean?

By Dave Roos

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The United States still has five permanently populated territories. The 3.5 million residents are denied many of the same rights as mainland U.S. citizens. They want this to change.

By John Donovan

Since it was built in 1885, New York's famous Hotel Chelsea has been home to countless artists, writers, poets and creatives and its history is the stuff of legend.

By Nathan Chandler

Since the mid-1970s, vice presidents have had use of a mansion on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Observatory, a short distance from the White House.

By Patrick J. Kiger

These towns, with all-white populations, may not be as blatant about their racism as they once were. But they're still here and being forced to face their ugly truth.

By John Donovan

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Every state has a capital city, which houses the government where all the legislative action happens. How much do you know about these capitals? Take our quiz to find out!

By Alia Hoyt

The White House Rose Garden has been the scene of many history-making events, but the story of its creation is a fascinating tale in itself.

By Wendy Bowman

The residents of the U.S. capital pay taxes, serve in the armed forces and contribute to America's economic strength but have no voting representation in Congress. Many Democrats want to change that.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Why not the Big Kumquat or the Big Banana? New York's fruity moniker actually had its beginnings in the sports pages and jazz clubs of the 1920s.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

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Lots of U.S. states have nicknames, but Missouri's flinty moniker arguably is one of the best.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Back in the early 1970s, two college coeds had the idea to create bracelets for sale to the public as a means of keeping imprisoned U.S. soldiers alive in the hearts and minds of the public. This is the story.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

It's hard to sum up something as big as a state in just a few words, but that doesn't stop them from trying! What does it mean to be from the 'Show-Me' state or to be a Sooner? Find out how vast your state nickname knowledge is with our quiz!

By Alia Hoyt

The saying is really true. Texas is big. And so is everything in it.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

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Frederick Douglass' pivotal 19th century abolitionist newspaper has been relaunched for a 21st century audience.

By Carrie Tatro

Before the 1964 Civil Rights Act and even after it, the tradition of the "great American road trip" was very different for families of color.

By Dave Roos

The roughly 2,000-mile boundary between the countries has been around only since the mid-1800s. But today it's a political line in the sand — literally and figuratively.

By John Donovan

Does February have special historical significance in African-American history?

By Carrie Tatro

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Was our current era defined by the introduction of the iPhone, the hashtag, and a professional wrestling appearance by a future U.S. president?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Has a nuclear bomb ever been dropped on the United States? Well, it happened back in the 1950s. But... it was an accident.

By Laurie L. Dove

The tension between the U.S. and USSR was palpable — and nearly devastating, thanks to some nuclear-tipped torpedoes and itchy trigger fingers.

By Kate Kershner

Treasure hunter Tommy Thompson claims he can't remember where he put 3 tons of gold from the shipwreck of the S.S. Central America. The courts don't believe him.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Ethnic brand identities and mascots affect people with different political leanings in surprising ways, at times increasing associations with Native American stereotypes.

By Christopher Hassiotis

In 1985, the Hanshin Tigers won the Japanese World Series. In the ensuing celebration, though, a statue of Colonel Sanders was drowned, and the team hasn't won since.

By Bryan Young