History vs. Myth

You don’t need fiction when history provides you with tales as crazy as the ones we’ve collected for you. Read up while your jaw drops.

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Trump's recent inquiry into the possibility of the United States buying Greenland made us wonder if countries can actually buy and sell each other.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Jimmy Hoffa mysteriously disappeared on July 30, 1975 and hasn't been seen since. We talked to one expert with an ingenious theory about what might have actually happened.

By Dave Roos

The ancient city of Babylon was a byword for wickedness in the Bible. But what is the real story? And how did Saddam Hussein try to bring it back?

By Dave Roos

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A bad LSD trip can drive a person to suicide. So why would the CIA use American citizens as guinea pigs for its drug research?

By Josh Clark

You probably know that Aphrodite was the ancient Greek goddess of love. Here are seven other facts you may not know about this enduring symbol of passion.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Apparently, Kansas is the state whose name is mispronounced.

By Dave Roos

Is he a jolly little man in jammies or a monster carrying a sack of eyeballs? European legend says the Sandman is probably both.

By Jesslyn Shields

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What does 'Massachusetts' mean? Why are there two Dakotas when one would have been plenty? Find out what you really know about the names of America's states and where they originated with our quiz.

By Nathan Chandler

Not all conspiracies are bogus. Some have managed to be real, and the work of the government.

By Diana Brown

After President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, the FBI left no stone unturned during its investigation. At one point, the investigation led to a most unlikely place.

By Bryan Young

Human bones were found in the basement of Benjamin Franklin's London home. Lots of human bones. Was one of America's most venerated Founding Fathers a criminal of the worst kind?

By Diana Brown & Mark Mancini

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A popular meme says that the U.S. Constitution notion of democracy really came from the Iroquois Great Law of Peace, except that the Native Americans' version was more inclusive. How true is this?

By Patrick J. Kiger

U.S. pilots at the time called them foo fighters, but were these UFOs weapons of war being developed by the Nazis? Many still say yes.

By Diana Brown

Conspiracy theorists claim the Smithsonian Institution holds the truth behind the ancient people that once thrived in the Grand Canyon — and they weren't Native Americans.

By Diana Brown

The ancient Greeks have been warning us about the rise and fall of technology as far back as Talos, everyone's favorite mythological man of bronze.

By Robert Lamb

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Thousands of pages related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy are now public information. Will they finally dispel years of conspiracies?

By Diana Brown

Did British Navy diver Lionel Crabb conspire with the Soviets or did they kill him for spying?

By Diana Brown

The Bermuda Triangle's Eastern counterpoint — the Dragon's Triangle — is located in the Philippine Sea and has supposedly been swallowing up ships for centuries.

By Diana Brown

There's no question the Titanic sank, but could it have been intentional? Some conspiracy theorists think so.

By Diana Brown

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Scientists and treasure hunters have searched for the fabled Nazi Gold Train for decades, but efforts have stepped up recently, thanks to new technology. A new group of searchers think they have a unique angle.

By Dave Roos

A small area of West Yellowstone National Park has no residents, which opens it up to a strange loophole: lawlessness.

By Diana Brown

End-of-days predictions have come and gone for, well, centuries. So, will the Sept. 23, 2017 prophecy be the first to come true?

By Sarah Gleim

Were Japanese fishermen visited by a beautiful Russian spy in 1803 — or was it an alien?

By Diana Brown

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Why do we call it a grandfather clock — instead of maybe grandmother clock?

By Mark Mancini

His mysterious vanishing sparked tons of speculation and one of the biggest missing person cases in U.S. history.

By Kate Kershner