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Historical Events

From the Age of Enlightenment to the Christmas Truce, learn about some of history's most pivotal events.

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How the Underground Railroad Worked

Harriet Tubman was known as "the Moses of her people" for her work on the Underground Railroad. How much do we really know about this secret system?

Castle History

Castle History is fascinating and reflects many of the social changes that took place during the Middle Ages. Learn about castle history at HowStuffWorks.

Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

Gettysburg Address, a speech delivered by Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863, at the dedication of Gettysburg National Cemetery near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Underground Railroad Information

Underground Railroad, a name applied to an informal network that aided runaway slaves from the South before the Civil War.

The Gettysburg Address

The Gettysburg Address was a speech delivered by Abraham Lincoln on November 19, 1863. Learn more about the Gettysburg Address.

How the French Revolution Worked

A screaming mob pressed in closer to watch as the guillotine dropped on King Louis' neck. With one swift slice, France's monarchy came to an end. But was a police state ruled by a madman a better alternative to a fat and lazy king?

How the Enlightenment Worked

The Age of Enlightenment was based on reason and science and featured some very heavy hitters: Voltaire, Descartes and Kant among them. But it took two Revolutions to truly test its principles.

How the Black Death Worked

Twenty-five million people died in the Black Death. How did this horrific disease spread, and how did people react to a killer they could not possibly comprehend?

Thebes

Thebes, a leading city of ancient Egypt from the 21st to the 11th century B.C. The Egyptians called this city Waset; the name “Thebes” was given it by the Greeks.

How the Gettysburg Address Worked

The Gettysburg Address was only about 300 words long -- Lincoln delivered it in about two minutes. But somehow, it changed the way we view our government, our country and our society.

How the Battle of Gettysburg Worked

The Battle of Gettysburg is probably the most famous battle ever fought on American soil -- it's considered the turning point of the Civil War. Did it really start because of shoes?

What Was the Christmas Truce?

World War I lasted more than four horrific years and took the lives of 8.5 million people. So why did soldiers spontaneously put down their guns and shake hands? And why did they start fighting again?

How Prohibition Worked

It's hard to believe that less than a century ago, the United States tried its best to legally ban alcohol. Prohibition spawned illegal speakeasies, organized crime and economic turmoil. Learn about it in this article.

Europe After World War I: November 1918-August 1931

World War I, also known as the Great War, left Germany and other countries humiliated and angry. This view was ignored. Learn about events that led to World War II.

World War II Timeline

World War II was a horrific period in history during which 50 million people perished from death camps, atomic bombs, and years of battle. Often called the Janus event of the 20th century, WWII is truly unforgettable. Learn how the Allies defeated Nazi Germany.

Aug. 31: Princess Diana Dies After a Car Crash

A decade ago, this beloved princess was killed in an auto accident while fleeing the paparazzi. Remember the legacy of Princess Diana, her family and her charity work on the 10th anniversary of her untimely death.

August 5: Nelson Mandela Arrested

Nelson Mandela was arrested on August 5, 1962. This arrest set in motion a chain of events that made Nelson Mandela a household name around the world.

The Hindenburg Crashes

The Hindenburg crash was a disaster on the scale of the Titanic. Learn about the Hindenburg crash, from the history of dirigibles to what may have gone wrong.

Ridiculous History: Using Animals in Espionage

A spying dolphin or a subversive squirrel may seem like far-fetched fiction, but animals have been employed by military forces for years.

Ridiculous History: Here's Why West Point Cadets Rioted Over Eggnog in 1826

Windows shattered, furniture broken, and dozens of cadets including Jefferson Davis nog-wild on smuggled booze. A "party" in 1826 nearly altered the course of history.

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